MH370 satellite images

An additional 122 objects have been identified by satellites over an area of the southern Indian Ocean while searching for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, Malaysian acting transport minister Hishammuddin Hussein has confirmed.

The satellite images, taken on 23 March, found the objects estimated to measure between 1m and 23m in length, with some objects appearing to be bright, indicating solid materials.

The Malaysian Remote Sensing Agency (MRSA) eceived the images from Airbus Defence and Space on 25 March. The objects were identified in an area measuring some 400km² that is 2,557km from Perth.

Although it is not confirmed if the potential objects belong to MH370, this can act as a new lead that will help direct the search operation, Hussein noted.

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"These newly found objects are the fourth set of satellite leads showing debris possibly related to MH370, and will result in further focused search operations."

MRSA’s latest findings have now been forwarded to the Australian Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Perth for further investigation.

These newly found objects are the fourth set of satellite leads showing debris possibly related to MH370, and will result in further focused search operations.

The Beijing-bound Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared off radars an hour after takeoff, more than two weeks ago.

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Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak recently announced that flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean without any likely survivors, citing new satellite data analysis. Australia is leading the search operations over the ocean, with several other nations involved.


Image: The location of unknown objects on satellite images dated 23 March processed by Malaysian Remote Sensing Agency (MRSA). Photo: courtesy of MRSA.

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