The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has concluded the critical operations phase of the newly launched Rapid Innovative Payload Demonstration Satellite 1 (RAPIS-1).

This phase involved the receipt of telemetry data from the RAPIS-1. The data showed that the satellite’s solar panels had started producing electricity to support its operations.

Completion of the critical operations phase has allowed the satellite to proceed to the 30-day in-orbit checkout phase, during which JAXA is set to assess the functions of the instruments onboard RAPIS-1.

The satellite was launched on 18 January aboard an Epsilon Launch Vehicle (Epsilon-4) from the JAXA Uchinoura Space Center in Japan.

The 200kg RAPIS-1 was developed by JAXA in collaboration with a Japan-based startup Axelspace.

“The satellite was launched as part of the Innovative Satellite Technology Demonstration-1 mission, which comprises a suite of seven small satellites.”

The satellite was launched as part of the Innovative Satellite Technology Demonstration-1 mission, which comprises a suite of seven small satellites.

Apart from the RAPIS-1, the Innovative Satellite Technology Demonstration-1 mission includes the MicroDragon, RISESAT, ALE-1, OrigamiSat-1, Aoba VELOX-IV and NEXUS satellites.

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The ALE 1 probe is developed by Astro Live Experiences to create artificial meteor showers, reported spacetechasia.com.

Japan’s Kyutechin collaboration with Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has developed the AOBE-VELOX-4 CubeSat to study and image the Lunar Horizon Glow.

Vietnamese space agency the Vietnam National Satellite Center (VNSC) created the 50kg MicroDragon Earth observation satellite.

The 50kg RISESAT was developed by the University of Tokyo in Japan and is equipped with eight international scientific payloads.

Tokyo Institute of Technology (TITech) has developed the OrigamiSat-1, while the NEXUS CubeSat was designed by Nihon University in partnership with Japan AMSAT Association (JAMSAT).