US-based aeroplane manufacturer Boeing has announced a fix for 737 Max aircraft, which have been grounded worldwide after two crashes that took place within six months.

The first crash took place earlier this month when a 737 Max belonging to Ethiopian Airlines crashed immediately after take-off and killed all 157 on board, and a Lion Air flight crashed in Indonesia last October.

BBC reported that all Boeing 737 planes will be equipped with a warning system, which was a previously paid option.

“Following the first incident in Indonesia, we followed the results of the independent authorities looking at the data.”

However, the company told to the reporters that the inclusion of the warning system across all its 737 fleet as a standard is not an admission that the system had led crashes in either of the cases according to the BBC.

A Boeing official was quoted by BBC as saying: “Following the first incident in Indonesia, we followed the results of the independent authorities looking at the data, and, as we are always looking to ways to improve, where we find ways to improve, we make those changes to make those improvements.”

In addition to the warning system, the company has announced that it will upgrade the Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), which has been developed to point the nose of an aircraft down automatically if sensors identify it is ascending too fast.

The updated software will have the ability to disable the feature if sensors send conflicting data.

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Boeing is planning to submit the final version of the software to the US Federal Aviation Administration for the approval.