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Boeing receives TAAG order for three 777-300ER aircraft

3 April 2012

TAAG airlines

Angola's flag carrier TAAG Linhas Aereas de Angola has placed an $895m order for three additional extended range (ER) Boeing 777-300 aircraft, which also comprises purchase rights for three additional 777-300ERs.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes Africa, Latin America, and Caribbean sales vice president, Van Rex Gallard, said: "TAAG operates an all-Boeing fleet and adding three more 777s to its fleet will help TAAG continue to meet its growing demand with products designed for passenger comfort and airline profitability."

TAAG plans to deploy the new 293-seat 777-300ERs to expand routes connecting Luanda to Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo in Brazil, Lisbon and Oporto in Portugal and additional European destinations.

The airliner's current fleet comprises three 777-200ERs and two 777-300ERs, which operate on flights from Luanda, Angola to Lisbon ten times a week, to Beijing once a week, to Dubai twice a week, to Sao Paulo four times a week and to Rio de Janeiro three times weekly.

Republic of Angola Transport Minister, Augusto da Silva Tomas, said: "TAAG's fleet will thus be a critical component of Angola's transportation network and a major contributor to the Angolan economy as a critical foreign revenue earner to our growing economy."

Powered by the General Electric GE90-115BL engine, producing 115,300lb of thrust, the lightweight Boeing 777-300ER reduces fuel requirement and produces 22% less carbon dioxide per seat and costs 20% less to operate per seat, according to Boeing.

The aircraft, featuring new technologies that reduce maintenance costs, has a maximum range of 7,930nm (14,685km).

Each wing of the 777-300ER is being extended by 6.5ft to enhance overall aerodynamic efficiency, while reducing takeoff field length and increasing mount performance.

 

Image: The 777-300ER will be configured according to the TAAG's requirement to carry 293 passengers in a three class configuration. Photo: Boeing.