Boeing wins $1.32bn order for five 787-9 Dreamliners from Donghai Airlines


Boeing has finalised a $1.32bn deal to sell five 787-9 Dreamliners to China-based Donghai Airlines.

Once delivered, the new aircraft will help expand Donghai Airlines’ fleet.

In July, the airline announced its intent to purchase 25 737 MAX 8s and five 787-9 Dreamliners from Boeing.

Last month, the airline finalised its 737 MAX 8 aircraft order, which was announced in July.

Donghai Airlines chairman Wong Cho-Bau said: "Donghai Airlines has undergone steady development over the past ten years since the beginning of our freighter operations in 2006.

"We will accelerate our fleet expansion plan to satisfy the rapidly growing air travel market and help build our home base Shenzhen as the transportation hub in southern China."

"Under China's One Belt One Road initiative, we will accelerate our fleet expansion plan to satisfy the rapidly growing air travel market and help build our home base Shenzhen as the transportation hub in southern China.

“Introducing these new next-generation airplanes that deliver the industry-leading fuel-efficiency and passenger comfort in their segment market will be a key effort for us to fulfil the plan."

The carrier currently operates a fleet of 13 Boeing 737-800 aircraft, which serves more than ten cities across China, and expects to add two more aircraft by the end of this year.

In a separate development, Boeing has entered into a new agreement with Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) to expand their joint research collaboration in relation with long-term sustainable growth of commercial aviation.

Under the deal, both companies will explore six areas of mutually beneficial research through the renamed Boeing-COMAC Sustainable Aviation Technology Centre.

The research areas include examining technologies that support sustainable aviation fuel development, air traffic management technologies and applications, development of environmentally sustainable manufacturing, and improved material recycling.