Nasa and SpaceX have launched the first flight test of a new spacecraft that has successfully arrived at the International Space Station (ISS).

The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft lifted off on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at Nasa’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, US.

The Crew Dragon spacecraft became the first privately designed and operated spacecraft, which is capable of carrying people to visit the outpost.

It carried a lifelike test device named Ripley, which is outfitted with sensors to provide data on potential effects on humans travelling in Crew Dragon.

“SpaceX plans to launch two astronauts this year under Nasa’s commercial crew programme if the six-day demonstration is successful.”

Crew Dragon has been designed to stay docked to the station for up to 210 days and will remain there for only six days, departing on 8 March.

The space vehicle is set to deliver more than 400lb of equipment and supplies to the space station.

After undocking from ISS, the spacecraft will begin its descent to Earth.

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SpaceX plans to launch two astronauts this year under Nasa’s commercial crew programme if the six-day demonstration is successful.

The company is also planning to launch a second demonstration mission, called Demo-2 in July, which will carry Nasa astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the ISS.

Nasa and SpaceX will use data from Demo-1, along with planned upgrades and additional qualification testing to further prepare for Demo-2.

Nasa’s Commercial Crew Program is currently working with Boeing and SpaceX to design, build, test and operate safe human transportation systems to low-Earth orbit.