The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has launched the GSAT-29 communication satellite into space from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh.

The three-stage heavy-lift rocket developed by ISRO known as the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle MarkIII (GSLV MKIII-D2) was used to launch the 3,423kg GSAT-29.

Around 17 minutes after the launch, the satellite was injected into a planned geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO).

Following the injection, ISRO’s Master Control Facility at Hassan, Karnataka, assumed control of the GSAT-29.

“India has achieved a significant milestone with our heaviest launcher lifting off the heaviest satellite from the Indian soil.”

Over the next few days, ISRO will perform three orbit-raising manoeuvres to place the satellite into its designated orbital position.

ISRO chairman Dr K Sivan said: “India has achieved a significant milestone with our heaviest launcher lifting off the heaviest satellite from the Indian soil.

“The launch vehicle has precisely placed the satellite in its intended orbit.”

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The GSAT-29 is a multiband, multi-beam communication satellite that is designed to serve remote areas in India, such as the northeastern regions and Jammu and Kashmir.

It is equipped with both Ku-band and Ka-band payloads, as well as a Q/V-Band communication payload, which aims to demonstrate future high-throughput satellite system technologies.

The GSAT-29 also features a geo high-resolution camera to capture high-resolution images, and optical communication payload to demonstrate high-speed data transmission using an optical communication link.

It is expected that ISRO will use the GSLV MKIII to launch the future Chandrayaan-2 and Gaganyaan missions.

Last June, the GSLV Mark III-D1 launched the 3,150kg GSAT-19 high-throughput communication satellite into orbit.