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The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has called on the Government of Jordan to provide financial relief to struggling airlines amid the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.

Some of the financial relief measures recommended by IATA include providing direct financial support to passenger and cargo carriers, reduction on air traffic control (ATC) charges and taxes.

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The association also urged the government to reduce, waive or defer government-imposed taxes and fees.

IATA Africa and the Middle East regional vice-president Muhammad Albakri said: “Jordan’s leaders have always understood the importance of having a sustainable aviation sector. They have prioritised policies that have encouraged the development of air connectivity that supports travel and tourism. But the Covid-19 crisis is putting that positive progress at risk.

“Airlines are fighting for survival. Passenger traffic has virtually stopped, and cash flows are almost non-existent. The consequences of the Jordanian economy are severe. Urgent financial support from the government is needed now to keep the sector alive.”

Analysis by IATA has revealed that revenues generated by airlines in the Jordanian market will drop by $700m (52%) compared with last year.

Air transport in Jordan contributes $2.2bn to the country’s GDP and supports some 70,000 jobs. The current situation due to the pandemic has put nearly 34,400 jobs and $1.1bn of GDP at risk.

Last month, IATA also called on governments to act on measures, including direct financial support, loans and tax relief to European carriers.

Global confirmed cases on Covid-19 is 4,443,793 cases while the death toll stands at 302,462.