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Air Canada has scaled down an earlier Boeing 737 Max aircraft order as major airlines strive to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak.

The Canadian carrier confirmed to the Financial Post that it has cancelled its order for 11 Max 9 variants of the aircraft.

Air Canada originally contracted Boeing for 61 Max jets in 2013. In the revised circumstances, the company decided to take 11 fewer units.

In an email, Air Canada spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick told the publication: “Aircraft purchases are long-term commitments based on future projections.

“Since that time, our requirements have evolved, so we are making adjustments to our order to better meet our anticipated needs.”

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Two Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft notably crashed in October 2018 and March 2019, which prompted aviation authorities to ground the aircraft series.

Air Canada fleet currently comprises 24 Max 8 jets. According to the spokesperson, the carrier has firm orders for 26 more units of the same variant, along with options for 18 aircraft and rights to purchase a further 30 units.

Fitzpatrick added: “Air Canada is fully committed to the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

“Prior to the aircraft’s grounding in March 2019, we were one of the largest operators of the 737 Max and we are actively preparing to return this aircraft to service following regulatory and other safety approvals.”

One of the largest airlines of the country, Air Canada, together with its partners, carried around 51 million passengers in 2018.

As part of its measures to alleviate the Covid-19 impact, Air Canada also decided to ease several rebooking rules and reduce the frequency of operations on several Asian routes.

Earlier this week, Australian airline Qantas Group announced that it will reduce its international capacity by nearly a quarter due to the outbreak.