Research and development (R&D) company C-CORE has received a C$9.6m subcontract from Airbus Defence and Space to design, develop, build and install the calibration transponder for the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Biomass Mission.

Airbus has been contracted by ESA to lead the development of a satellite that will measure and monitor carbon stored in the Earth’s forests over time.

The Biomass Mission focuses on the status and dynamics of tropical forests, where around 80% of the world’s biomass is located.

Measuring more than 8m in diameter, the calibration transponder will be able to receive signals from the satellite and transmit a reference signal to make sure onboard sensors are accurately calibrated.

“We have built significant knowledge in the space industry here at C-CORE and have earned a worldwide reputation as a leading expert in this area.”

The information delivered by the transponder is expected to help improve existing assessments and future projections of the Earth’s carbon cycle.

The calibration transponder project will be led by C-CORE, which is the prime contractor to provide project management and lead the technical development of the transponder.

Other partners in the project include Italy’s Ingegneria Dei Sistemi (IDS), Luxembourg’s HITEC, and Ireland’s Arup.

Should Boeing be bailed out?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

C-CORE president and CEO Paul Griffin said: “We have built significant knowledge in the space industry here at C-CORE and have earned a worldwide reputation as a leading expert in this area.

“It’s incredibly satisfying to contribute to a project that is important to all of us – understanding and protecting our environment.”

To be built at C-CORE’s facility in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, the transponder will be installed at a remote location specially chosen to meet the mission’s needs.

Airbus Defence and Space Canada president Simon Jacques said: “Collaboration between Airbus, the European Space Agency and C-CORE will enhance the quality of data available to researchers and result in better global environmental outcomes.”

C-CORE expects to complete the project work in three phases over a four-year period.