The global aviation industry represented by Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) and more than 30 other associations has called upon US President Donald Trump and Congress to end the partial shutdown.

The partial government shutdown started on 22 December 2018 and has put aircraft safety inspections, the introduction of new planes and routes, as well as other operations, on hold.

According to the industry representatives, the shutdown has affected the $1.5tn civil aviation sector.

The industry sent a letter to the president, highlighting the effects and damages caused by the shutdown.

International Air Transport Association (IATA), Airlines for America, Air Line Pilots Association, Air Traffic Control Association, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association are among the signees of the letter.

“Our elected leaders need to understand their political standoff has real-world consequences for workers, companies and the economy.”

ARSA executive vice-president Christian Klein said: “Our elected leaders need to understand their political standoff has real-world consequences for workers, companies and the economy.”

The association also noted that the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which employs air traffic controllers, maintenance staff and aviation security personnel, is badly affected by the shutdown.

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The shutdown has forced the FAA employees to work without pay, thereby deteriorating their financial condition and negatively impacting the overall industry.

The majority of the FAA employees involving in the certification of aircraft safety have been laid off. Safety reporting and oversight systems have also been suspended due to the shutdown.

The shutdown has also resulted in the suspension of training of air traffic controllers, certification and regulatory reform activities, and issuance of new student pilot certificates, among others.

Klein added: “The FAA has suspended certification of mechanics, repairman and repair stations, as well as other oversight work.

“Delays in getting new approvals or certificates can mean missed business and career opportunities and lost revenues.

“It’s only a matter of time before those impacts ripple through the workforce, affect air carrier operations and harm the local economies where repair stations are located.”