Multinational firm Amazon is reportedly planning to launch thousands of satellites in low-Earth orbit to provide global broadband internet access.

Known as Project Kuiper, the venture involves the construction, launch and operations of a 3,236-satellite constellation in space, according to federal filings accessed by GeekWire.

The filings were made by Kuiper Systems with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

An Amazon spokesperson was quoted by CNBC as saying: “Project Kuiper is a new initiative to launch a constellation of low-Earth orbit satellites that will provide low-latency, high-speed broadband connectivity to unserved and underserved communities around the world.”

“This is a long-term project that envisions serving tens of millions of people who lack basic access to broadband internet.”

“This is a long-term project that envisions serving tens of millions of people who lack basic access to broadband internet. We look forward to partnering on this initiative with companies that share this common vision.”

The filings made by Kuiper Systems did not disclose the cost of the project and the expected timeline.

According to the GeekWire report, 784 satellites of the constellation will be operated at an altitude of 367 miles. The network will also include 1,296 at a height of 379 miles.

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The remaining 1,156 satellites will operate in 391-mile orbits.

With data coverage for areas ranging in latitude from 56°N to 56°S, the project seeks to cover 95% of Earth’s population.

Meanwhile, according to a CNBC report, Amazon hired senior personnel from the SpaceX Starlink project to lead the Kuiper programme.

Several companies such as SpaceX, OneWeb and Facebook are currently in the race to launch space-based global high-speed internet.

SpaceX aims to operate a constellation of 4,425 satellites, while OneWeb’s network will include 650 interconnected satellites.

Last year, the Elon Musk-owned company launched two prototypes for the Starlink project.