Bombardier to continue Global 7000 aircraft flight test programme despite ‘in-flight flameout’


Bombardier has revealed its intention to continue carrying out the ongoing flight test programme of its Global 7000 aircraft despite an ‘in-flight flameout’ that occurred during a trial earlier this month.

During the incident, the right engine of the flight-test vehicle 2 (FTV2) suffered an in-flight flameout after experiencing high vibration levels and high inter-turbine temperature (ITT) readings.

The occurrence was revealed in a report published by the National Transportation Safety Board of Canada, reported American Machinist.

“Bombardier and GE have determined that the root cause of last week’s reported occurrence was an isolated event."

The FTV2 is equipped with GE Aviation Passport jet engines and being operated by Bombardier’s flight test group in Wichita, Kansas, US.

The in-flight flameout reportedly occurred when the vehicle was flying over the state at an altitude of 41,000ft.

Bombardier said in a statement: “Safety is our top priority. Our test pilots, following an occurrence last week, followed standard procedures and returned to base uneventfully.

“Bombardier and GE have determined that the root cause of last week’s reported occurrence was an isolated event.

“The Global 7000 aircraft programme’s flight and ground test campaigns continue on track for entry-into-service in the second half of 2018 and GE’s Passport engine received its US Federal Aviation Association (FAA) type certification in early 2016.”

Bombardier also noted that the first six Global 7000 aircraft, already ordered by customers, are now in production and will soon undergo final assembly line activities.